Looking Back…

img_3197Looking back on 2019 I see that I took roughly the same number of ‘proper’ photos (ie with my actual camera as opposed to my smartphone) as in previous years.  What is a little concerning is that apart from a couple of organised events that I went to during the year, most of my photos have been taken during holidays. I haven’t been ‘going out’ very much other times specifically to take photos.

By contrast, the number of photos taken on my smartphone has increased by over 50% this year.  This is no doubt due to having a new and much better phone – the iPhone 11 Pro, with its multiple lens options.  Whereas in previous years I would often take either my Sony A7 or at least a compact camera pretty much everywhere with me, nowadays I only take the Sony when I envisage the opportunity for some ‘considered’ photography. I reckon my smartphone images are ‘good enough’ for family, occasions, and casual photos where I only anticipate viewing them on screen, and of course the phone is way more compact and convenient than a bag holding a camera body, lenses and filters.  As an aside, there have been a few photographs (mainly at night) where the enhanced processing and AI capabilities of the iPhone have yielded photographs I don’t think would have been possible even with the Sony…

A7304384-HDRIndeed, the whole issue of how much I can sensibly carry has caused me to slim down my photo gear – the bigger, heavier lenses have all gone, as has the filter system that went with them, and I now just have one camera body, a couple of smaller lenses and a few other bits and pieces in my bag. I’ve reduced the scope of what I can photograph somewhat, and maybe reduced the ultimate image quality marginally, but my backpack now weighs about 50% less, and is definitely more manageable. This hasn’t translated into going out more yet, but I’m sure it will – there have certainly been occasions over the last year or two where I’ve passed up on opportunities to go out shooting because I couldn’t face the prospect of carrying the gear! And that does make good sense – with my 70th birthday looming, and an obvious reduction in my strength, stamina and mobility, I’ve (finally) recognised that I have to adapt to change…

Porthleven sunset (2)So I guess it remains to be seen whether this slimming down of gear to more manageable proportions does result in me getting out and actually taking more photos. I do think a change of direction is called for anyway – for years I’ve considered myself primarily a landscape photographer, but am less and less interested in the genre. Some of that is the challenge of getting to often out of the way spots either very early in the morning or late in the evening, and I do find so many of the landscape photos I see as somewhat formulaic – sunsets, sunrises and sea, either all misty and ethereal or using very long exposures… After 60 years taking photographs I really want to try something different and more creative rather than replicating the sort of photos I see all over the internet.

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That’s looking forward, but a few of my highlights from 2019 are as follows:

Gran Canaria – we started our year’s holidays here, and although we didn’t travel far from our hotel, there was still lots to see.

Cornwall – we spent a week there in May and then a few days right at the end of the year. The coastline and sea is always the pull for me.

Ireland – we toured the Wild Atlantic Way – Ireland’s rugged West Coast, but the highlight for me was the Giants Causeway in Antrim, somewhere that’s been on my bucket list for a long time!

Santorini – a late summer holiday on this delightful Greek island. Lots of white houses and churches with blue roofs.

Liverpool – an evening trip with a bunch of fellow togs to photograph the lights around the Albert Dock area.

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Coast and City…

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Perch Rock Lighthouse

Last week I had the opportunity to spend a few spare hours in the Liverpool area, so decided to check out the lighthouse at Perch Rock, New Brighton. This lighthouse has stood at the mouth of the River Mersey since 1830 and was only decommissioned in 1973. I misjudged the tides, and with the tide almost fully in when I got there, I wasn’t able to walk out to the lighthouse itself, but had to be content with taking photos from the edge of the promenade.  A stiff breeze meant there were waves 3-4 ft high, so it very much suited a long exposure treatment. Locking down the ISO to 64, and using a 10 stop filter gave me a decently long exposure, and I was pretty pleased overall with the result.

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Tate Liverpool

From here I used the Wallasey Tunnel to ‘pop’ into Liverpool and spent an hour or so around the Albert Dock area. I’ve taken photos before of the hundreds of padlocks affixed to the railings on the edge of the dock, but there are now so many its virtually impossible to get a ‘clean’ shot of the padlocks.  However the railings around the entrance to the Merseyside Maritime Museum were nicely lit by the afternoon sun, and made a good ‘frame’ for the sign outside the Liverpool Tate Museum. A wide-ish aperture softened the lettering on the sign, and created some useful separation.

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Museum of Liverpool

With construction work going on, there are barriers up all around the iconic front elevation of the Museum of Liverpool just now, so I had to be happy with a reflection of the The Three Graces in the picture windows at the end of the building.

Given that I only had a couple of hours altogether, and was ‘traveling light’ with just one lens (12-40mm on my Olympus E-M1ii) and a couple of round filters I was pleased with the results from the afternoon.

Liverpool #Streetlife Photos

While street photography isn’t really my genre, I couldn’t turn down the opportunity to go on the free #Streetlife ‘photo walk’ in Liverpool sponsored by FujiFilm and Clifton Cameras, and lead by Matt Hart. I’ve a lot of time for Matt’s work, and never really explored Liverpool, so far too good an opportunity to miss.

A bright sunny early autumn day saw close to 100 photographers of all ages turn up at the Albert Dock, sporting everything from Fuji CSC cameras, big Canikon DSLRs, right down to just iPhones and iPads. After a brief intro by Matt, we all set out along the waterfront, but quickly split up into smaller groups as we roughly followed the preset circular route, taking in highlights like Bold Street, the ‘bombed out church’ (St Lukes) and the beautiful Georgian Quarter. We didn’t stay too long around Lime Street Station as there was a political demonstration going on that could have turned nasty, so headed on past the Central Library, the shops of Liverpool One, and back to the waterfront area – in total a very enjoyable 4 miles or so, over 6 hours.  All in all a great day out, and I have a good number of photos I’m happy with – mostly ‘characters’ but also some cameo shots of some of the buildings and sights in a fine city.

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I don’t think there’s any doubt that I will be back to Liverpool again soon!

EDIT – all photos taken with the remarkable 90mm f2 Fuji XF lens and X-T1 camera.